I enjoyed this (very short) article. Three may not be a representative sample. But for those working well up stream of housing delivery, it never hurts to turn our mind to the aspirations of the ultimate customer, current and future!

Neariah says she wants a penthouse, but is not materialistic. In my mind this is not the contradiction it might at first appear. Her concern is the environment she occupies, not what she fills it with. Very sensible. She seems to be mentally prepared for a life of renting to achieve this.

It also raises questions about how relevant space standards are to a future generation who care less about 'things', but this is ground I have covered before in my article "The good side of permitted developments and why we should apply its principles".

Also of note are the differing views they appear to have and in particular in relation to car parking.  Jess in Manchester and Scott in Glasgow both dream of their own private garage. Perhaps Neariah also imagines a dedicated spot for her London penthouse in a basement parking lot, but she doesn't say so here.

I have found it difficult to countenance recent arguments that developers are building with too much of focus on car parking. Within London, developers would invariably minimise car parking if they could, but are commonly thwarted by the social and political forces of nimbyism, whose primary concern is the availability of parking for existing residents.  

Outside of London a developer can't afford not to provide car parking, unless investment and innovation into transport infrastructure hits a whole new level. Otherwise new homes wont be built, and Jess and Scott will be spending their money elsewhere.